Novak Djokovic back in immigration detention ahead of his visa showdown – as big rival Rafael Nadal

Novak Djokovic was taken to an immigration detention center after his visa was again revoked, with top players slamming the unvaccinated champion.

The Serbian tennis star was seen driving inside the Park Hotel complex at the Carlton in Melbourne on Saturday afternoon, where he must remain until his appeal to the Federal Court is heard on Sunday morning.

The hero player, who has polarized views around the world, is expected to spend at least one more night in the infamous detention center alongside the asylum seekers.

On Saturday, he spoke with immigration officials at an undisclosed location at 8 a.m. Border authorities later arrested the 34-year-old based on a court-ordered arrangement.

Djokovic’s lawyers then presented their arguments during an online federal court hearing presided over by Judge David Ocalagan at his attorney’s offices at 10.15 a.m.

Djokovic was escorted into the Carlton Park Hotel complex in Melbourne on Saturday afternoon, where he must remain until his appeal to federal court is heard on Sunday morning (pictured, Djokovic in the back seat of a car returning to an official detention center on Saturday)

Media and protesters gather outside the infamous detention center hotel where the unvaccinated Serbian tennis star is staying (pictured, a car belonging to Novak Djokovic returning to the Park Hotel in Melbourne)

Media and protesters gather outside the infamous detention center hotel where the unvaccinated Serbian tennis star is staying (pictured, a car belonging to Novak Djokovic returning to the Park Hotel in Melbourne)

Pro-refugee protesters gathered outside the Carlton Hotel where Djokovic was taken on Saturday (Pictured, protesters and media outside the Park Hotel in Melbourne)

Pro-refugee protesters gathered outside the Carlton Hotel where Djokovic was taken on Saturday (Pictured, protesters and media outside the Park Hotel in Melbourne)

His hardline legal team is expected to face a tougher time in overturning the latest visa ban than they did on January 10, when Australian Border Force officials detained him for the first time.

The Serbian star remains the focus of the world and a magnet for fiery debates about health, science, politics and immigration.

Anti-extremism supporters, commentary and anti-immigration protesters rallied in Rod Laver Arena and outside the notorious detention center where some asylum seekers have been housed for years.

On the tennis court, 200 anti-vaccine protesters chanted “Free Novak” and “Let him play” as well as numerous anti-vaccine slogans and mandate masks.

Emma Raducano, the young US Open champion, said the scandal had become a distraction

Emma Raducano, the young US Open champion, said the scandal had become a distraction

Novak's great rival, Rafael Nadal, said no one is greater than the Australian Open

Novak’s great rival, Rafael Nadal, said no one is greater than the Australian Open

Djokovic is seen arriving in the back of a white sedan as he rolls back into the detention hotel complex, wearing a green tracksuit and a white face mask.

With the Australian Open’s top seed returning to the facility, the contender racing to win 21 Grand Slam titles, Spaniard Rafael Nadal said the fiasco was a distraction.

“Honestly, I’m a little tired of the situation because I think it’s important to talk about our sport and tennis,” Nadal said.

No single player in history is more important than the event, right? [It] It’s going to be a great Australian Open with or without it.

Novak Djokovic (pictured with his wife) is aiming for his 21st Grand Slam title, which would top fellow legends Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal.

Novak Djokovic (pictured with his wife) is aiming for his 21st Grand Slam title, which would top fellow legends Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal.

Tsitsipas, who was defeated by Djokovic in the French Open final last year (pictured), said the world No. 1 Serbian was 'playing by his own rules'.

Tsitsipas, who was defeated by Djokovic in the French Open final last year (pictured), said the world No. 1 Serbian was ‘playing by his own rules’.

The world number 4 player in the Greek men’s lottery Stefanos Tsitsipas, criticized Djokovic for making his fellow immunized “look fools”.

“Statistics are that 98 per cent of players have been vaccinated and done what they had to do in order to come and play in Australia,” Tsitsipas told India’s WIO News.

“A very small group chose to go their own way and that makes the majority look like they’re all idiots or something.”

Meanwhile, illustrious US Open champion Emma Raducano shared her thoughts on the scandal.

“I feel it took away a bit of the great tennis that was happening this summer in Australia… that way it became a distraction.”

She believed that people missed out on other star-worthy shows, like the return of Brett Andy Murray.

The main reasons behind Djokovic’s visa revocation were revealed on Saturday as Minister Alex Hawke said his presence in Australia could “reinforce anti-vaccination sentiment”.

Hook announced Friday that he was revoking the Serbian tennis star’s visa for a second time, citing a long list of reasons including that Djokovic showed “clear disregard” for isolation after a positive test result.

The main reasons behind Novak Djokovic's visa revocation have been revealed with Immigration Minister Alex Hawke saying his presence in Australia may 'reinforce anti-vaccination sentiment'

The main reasons behind Novak Djokovic’s visa revocation have been revealed with Immigration Minister Alex Hawke saying his presence in Australia may ‘reinforce anti-vaccination sentiment’

Court documents show the reasons why Mr. Hook revoked Djokovic's visa

Court documents show the reasons why Mr. Hook revoked Djokovic’s visa

Hook said Djokovic also formed

Hook said Djokovic also posed a “danger to the good order of Australian society”, in that his stay in Australia could create a “public disruption” to the values ​​of Australian society.

Immigration Minister Alex Hawke (pictured) has revoked Djokovic's visa for the second time.  The Serbian star is fighting his deportation

Immigration Minister Alex Hawke (pictured) has revoked Djokovic’s visa for the second time. The Serbian star is fighting his deportation

I believe Mr Djokovic’s continued presence in Australia could lead to an increase in anti-vaccination sentiment in the Australian community, which could lead to an increase in civil unrest of the kind Australia experienced previously with rallies and protests which may themselves be a source of community transmission, Mr Hawke said as it appears in Court documents.

The drama around the Novak Djokovic case is set to be captured in a documentary series that will be the tennis version of Drive To Survive.

Sportsmail Understands a crew already in Australia filming what has been the most explosive start to the tennis season in recent years, thanks to the fiasco surrounding World No. 1.

The normally disjointed ruling sport’s stakeholders have united to support and approve the new project, which will eventually be streamed on Netflix.

Novak Djokovic Australian Open Epic SAGA Visa

Novak Djokovic’s defense of his Australian Open title remains in doubt after Australian immigration officials revoked his visa for the second time.

Here’s how the saga unfolded:

January 4th: Djokovic wrote on Twitter that he is on his way to the Australian Open under a medical exemption. He wrote on Instagram: “I had a great time with my loved ones during the break, and today I am heading Down Under with a waiver. Let’s start 2022!!

January 5: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison warns Djokovic he will be on the next plane if his medical exemption is deemed insufficient, and insists Djokovic will not receive preferential treatment.

January 5: Djokovic’s visa is canceled upon arrival in Melbourne. The Australian Border Force declared that the player “failed to provide adequate evidence to meet the entry requirements for Australia”.

January 6th: Djokovic was sent to the Park Hotel in Melbourne after being refused a visa. He launched an appeal, which was adjourned until 10 a.m. on January 10. Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic said Djokovic was a victim of “persecution”.

January 9: Djokovic’s lawyers claim he was granted a vaccine exemption to enter Australia because he tested positive for Covid-19 in Serbia on December 16. However, social media posts indicate that he attended a number of social events in the days following his apparent diagnosis.

January 10: Judge Anthony Kelly overturned Djokovic’s visa revocation, ordering the Australian government to pay legal costs and release Djokovic from detention within half an hour. Djokovic says he is “happy and grateful” and hopes “to stay and try to compete”.

January 11: Djokovic’s title defense remains in doubt as Australia’s immigration minister considers whether he will override a court ruling, reportedly due to an alleged misleading claim Djokovic made on his entry form relating to his movements in the 14 days prior to his arrival in Australia.

January 12: Djokovic admits to making a “miscalculation” by attending an interview with a French journalist while he tested positive. He adds that although he attended a children’s tennis event the day after the test, he did not receive notification of the positive test until after the event.

January 13th: Djokovic will meet his Serbian compatriot Miomir Kikmanovic in the first round.

January 14: Immigration Minister Alex Hook has revoked Djokovic’s visa for a second time, saying in a statement it was “for reasons of health and order”.

Reports by the Palestinian Authority

.

Leave a Comment