Met could launch Downing Street party investigation

The Met could start a Downing Street party investigation if the Whitehall investigation led by Sue Gray discovers ‘criminal evidence of lawbreaking’

  • Scotland Yard has claimed they can still investigate the 10th closing ceremonies
  • The Met Police has been criticized for its inaction on numerous violations
  • Chief Ethics Officer Sue Gray investigates Bring Your Favorite Beverage claims










Scotland Yard said last night that police could investigate Downing Street closures if a Whitehall investigation found “significant evidence” of a breach of the law.

The Met has faced criticism from opposition politicians for refusing to investigate allegations that multiple parties have been held in 10th place in violation of Covid laws in the past two years.

Whitehall’s chief ethics officer, Sue Gray, is investigating the allegations, including the ‘bring your own booze’ party attended by Boris Johnson at the height of the first lockdown on May 20, 2020.

In a statement last night, Scotland Yard said it would only consider opening its own investigation if Miss Gray revealed evidence of possible criminal offences.

In a statement last night, Scotland Yard said it would only consider opening its own investigation if Miss Gray revealed evidence of possible criminal offences.

In a statement last night, Scotland Yard said it would only consider opening its own investigation if Miss Gray revealed evidence of possible criminal offences.

In a statement last night, Scotland Yard said it would consider opening its own investigation only if Miss Gray revealed evidence of possible criminal offences.

She said: “If significant evidence is available indicating a violation of regulations, officers may review and consider it.

The Cabinet Office is conducting an investigation into the gatherings at 10 Downing Street and the Department of Education.

The Met has ongoing contact with the Cabinet Office regarding this inquiry. If the investigation identifies evidence of behavior that potentially constitutes a criminal offense, it will be sent to the Met for further study.

The statement issued last night added to the pressure on Ms. Gray, who is working to complete her investigation into the events.

Several Tory MPs privately cautioned that they expect Johnson to resign if the report is found against him. However, last night Ministers were increasingly confident that Miss Gray would not directly criticize the Prime Minister for attending the events.

A source in Whitehall said: “It looks like it won’t deal a fatal blow to the PM. It won’t be a complete vindication – there will be criticism of the culture at No10 and the amount of drinking going on at work.

The prime minister is ultimately responsible for that culture that has allowed rule-breaking to continue. But I would be very surprised if I suggested that he had broken the rules himself.

Another well-informed source said: “She will only present the facts – she is not an executioner. In the end, the verdict will be the prime minister, although in this case I doubt it will be in the jurisdiction of the court of public opinion.”

However, Culture Minister Nadine Doris said Ms. Gray was an “independent” figure who was well respected for her work. “I know it wouldn’t be an excuse because a professional civil servant wouldn’t,” she told Sky News. Sources said last night that Ms. Gray’s report may be released by the end of next week.

However, one stressed the need for it to be comprehensive, adding, “The last thing we need is to report Sue Gray and another party’s allegations leak out the next day.” The results of Miss Gray’s investigation will be presented to the Prime Minister. No10 couldn’t say who, if anyone, would decide what penalties he should face if he was criticized.

Labor deputy leader Angela Rayner suggested the investigation could make Johnson act as “judge and jury” about his behaviour.

She said any matters relating to ministers uncovered in the investigation would be dealt with under the ministerial law – for which the prime minister ultimately assumes responsibility.

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