Fact checkers say YouTube lets its platform be ‘weaponised’ by misinformation

It invites more than 80 fact-checking organizations Youtube To address what they say is misinformation spread on the platform.
In a letter to CEO Susan Wojcicki published on Wednesday, the groups said that google browserThe proprietary video platform is “one of the main channels of online disinformation and disinformation around the world”.

They say YouTube’s efforts to address the problem are insufficient.

More than 80 fact-checking organizations are calling on YouTube to tackle alleged misinformation on the platform.  And misinformation around the world."
More than 80 fact-checking organizations are calling on YouTube to address alleged misinformation on the platform. (AFP)

“What we don’t see is a great deal of effort by YouTube to implement policies that address the issue,” the message reads.

“On the contrary, YouTube allows its platform to be used as a weapon by unscrupulous actors to manipulate and exploit others and to organize themselves and raise money.”

These groups said the problem is particularly prevalent in non-English speaking countries and the Global South.

The fact-checkers are all members of the International Fact-Checking Network and include Rappler in the Philippines, Africa Cheek, Scientific Reaction in France and dozens of other groups.

They have criticized YouTube, saying it frames discussions about disinformation as a “false segmentation” of whether or not to delete content.

Fact-checkers wrote that displaying verified information is more effective than deleting content.

In a letter to CEO Susan Wojcicki, the groups said the video platform is "One of the main channels of misinformation online.
In a letter to CEO Susan Wojcicki, the groups said the video platform is “one of the main channels of online disinformation.” (AFP)

They suggest that YouTube focuses on providing context and false ideas that are “clearly imposed” on videos. They also called on YouTube to take action against repeat offenders and step up efforts against disinformation in languages ‚Äč‚Äčother than English.

In a statement, YouTube spokeswoman Elena Hernandez said the company “has invested heavily in policies and products in all the countries in which we work to connect people to trusted content, reduce the spread of misinformation at borders, and remove offending videos.”

She called fact-checking a “critical tool to help viewers make their own informed decisions,” but added that “addressing the spread of misinformation is one piece of a much larger puzzle.”

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