Ballerinas ditch the traditional tutu, now deemed too restrictive both physically and artistically

The tutu, a staple of ballet dancers, may be about to appear in the history books, as many dancers and art directors have said they are keen to steer clear of the traditional skirt.

Being too restrictive, both in terms of body and art form, the Observer reports that an increasing number of ballet stars are avoiding the tutu, once a symbol of classical dance.

Among them, Australian-born ballerina Liane Benjamin, who revealed in her autobiography Built for Ballet, that she dislikes wearing a dress.

The skirt, first worn by ballerina Marie Taglioni in 1832, is still admired by ballet fans and dancers, but he was the artistic director of the Australian Ballet. David Hallberg, said his dancers are now equally happy to move away from tulle skirts to try “something new.”

Retired Australian ballerina Leanne Benjamin said she fell in love with Tutu throughout her career and told The Observer that some dancers and directors around the world have turned their backs on traditional ballet attire (pictured at Les Biches at the Royal Opera in Covent). garden)

Benjamin, who appeared in the photo in front of her autobiography, confessed

Benjamin, pictured in front of her autobiography Built for Ballet, admitted that she did not like to wear a tutu on stage, but was relieved that many of her contemporaries did.

“I argue in my book that I personally did not like wearing a skirt, but most of my contemporaries do,” said retired dancer Benjamin.

She said she doesn’t pretend to speak for everyone, but added that because skirts were a costume style, they could be influenced by society’s conversations about sex, and traditional ballet heroines could get new, modern clothes to fit the changes in society.

“I think we all anticipate and enjoy evolution, and so we’ll welcome what comes next,” she said.

Director Hallberg, who did not stage a “traditional” ballet with tutus for the Australian Ballet, echoed that sentiment, telling the Guardian: “I think the Australian ballet audience is very open to the new.”

Leanne Benjamin and Edward Watson at the Royal Ballet "Qualia" At the Royal Opera House Covent Garden

Leanne Benjamin and Edward Watson at the performance of the Royal Ballet “Qualia” at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden

Classic role, classic attire: Benjamin wears a miniskirt as The Sugar Plum Fairy while representing the ballet

Classic role, classic attire: Benjamin wears a miniskirt as The Sugar Plum Fairy while representing the ballet troupe “The Nutcracker”

Could gender-neutral clothing on stage soon become the norm?  Benjamin dancing in a leotard as Anna Anderson in the 2004 Royal Opera House version of Anastasia

Could gender-neutral clothing on stage soon become the norm? Benjamin dancing in a leotard as Anna Anderson in the 2004 Royal Opera House version of Anastasia

He added that the dancers were open to trying new things and were not limited to the same opinions as traditional ballets such as the Russian Bolshoi or the French Ballet.

Meanwhile, Jo Meredith, creative director of the UK’s National Youth Ballet, also preferred gender-neutral clothing over tutus for her production of Kurt Welle The Seven Deadly Sins.

She said she gave up the skirt business in order to produce it, because the ballet is set in the 1930s and the cast will be in tuxedos.

She added that young ballerinas are usually aware of gender issues and this affects their artistic choices.

Layan wears modern fashion in Adam's Children in 2007

The dancer at Anastasia in 2004, sworn in at the Royal Ballet

Lian’s modern sportswear at Adam’s Children in 2007, left, and at Anastasia in 2004, performed by the Royal Ballet.

Benjamin and Carlos Acosta at the Royal Ballet Productions of Rhapsody at the Royal Opera

Benjamin and Carlos Acosta at the Royal Ballet Productions of Rhapsody at the Royal Opera

She set the example of Spanish ballerina and director Tamara Rojo, artistic director of the English National Ballet at the Colosseum in London.

Rojo did not use tutus is her modern adaptation of Raymonda by Alexander Glazunov and Marius Petipa.

Meredith added that the concept of the ballerina is evolving all the time and that while ballet skirts such as those worn by romantic ballet characters such as Gisele and Sugar Plum Fairy are still ballet staples, gender-neutral clothing for ballerinas is a way to `maintain the look` of ballerinas. New and exciting.

Benjamin agreed that tutus are not always relevant to modern productions of classical ballet

But she relaxed that she wasn’t struggling to give up miniskirts forever, and said clothes can evolve with time rather than disappear entirely.

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